Nilly

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Hey there! My name is Nilly, I majored in Computer Science and I currently work as a Systems Analyst. I have also been mentored by Jack Canfield, the author of Chicken Soup for the Soul, to become certified in teaching his success principles globally as a Peak Performance speaker to others hoping to inspire and have the same impact as I had from him.  I moved to America when I was 6 ½ years old and didn’t know how to speak English like most children. Instead of holding me back, I feel like this made me who I am today – a voice for young Muslim women.

As a voice for young Muslim women,  I am an ambassador for the Shared Hope International, a non profit organization combatting human trafficking.

As a voice for young Muslim women,  I am an ambassador for the Shared Hope International, a non profit organization combatting human trafficking. As an ambassador, I enforce prevention education to schools, government officials, social workers, and foster home officials. Human trafficking is an issue close to my heart because of how I saw many children out on the streets of India that were victims of it. Children are used because bodies can be reused, returning more profit than other products sold such as drugs, weapons, etc. It made me sick to my stomach seeing this young souls going through such horrible childhoods at the hands of these malicious people. I thought that this issue was only in India, but when I came to America, I learned that this issue is everywhere- just because you are in a richer area does not mean its not happening.

A lot of children in the United States are being trafficked without moving anywhere. Girls tend to have “pimps” or lovers who will know exactly how to reel them in by making them believe that this man “loves” them. These men will hit on younger women who are vulnerable and begin to give them gifts, time, and affection because they view being it all as being an investment. It’s heartbreaking to see just how much abuse, both mental and physical, these girls endure later on because of believing a facade. I hope that prevention education is a way for us all to ensure this happens less and less.

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Aside from being a Human Trafficking Prevention educator, I am an upcoming TEDx speaker in September. There was another women’s conference that same weekend but I could not be apart of it. I told my mentor that I couldn’t come but referred a fellow female speaker who I knew would do an amazing job. I feel like supporting my colleagues and giving them the spotlight does not necessarily mean it is stolen from me. People will often ask me, “Isn’t that person your competition? Why are you referring them?” The way I view it is that I simply cannot be everywhere. I rather my spot go to another person who is working hard and deserve it, especially if it is a woman.

People will often ask me, “Isn’t that person your competition? Why are you referring them?” The way I view it is that I simply cannot be everywhere. I rather my spot go to another person who is working hard and deserve it, especially if it is a woman. 

Overall, I have been on both sides of the “competition” so many women face. I have had friends who were my cheerleaders only when it benefited them, and I have others who have stood by me from day one. I have always found that this competition for attention in women is a result from our childhood. I feel women tend to compete more, especially when their social structure is threatened. It’s always about the best hair, best body, best wedding, best Instagram accounts. As a result, we feel pressure to look the best and be the most accomplished. I have trained myself that instead of seeing women as competition, I should view them as co-creators, especially in a field where speakers are competing against each other and racing for the spot. In order to do that, I had to work on my self perception. I knew if I viewed my own self as a strong and powerful person, I wouldn’t feel threatened by other women who were powerful in their own way.

I have trained myself that instead of seeing women as competition, I should view them as co-creators, especially in a field where speakers are competing against each other and racing for the spot.

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I cheer for people, and I think I get this compassion to want the best for others from my Mom. I was raised to believe that there is enough sun for everyone. I always say that if I could be even  5% as generous as she is, I would be so incredibly lucky. She is the kind of person that if you left her at the line in the mall, she would make friends with everyone. She is a great friend and supporter, and I strive to be like her. I actually come across a woman just like her  during one of Jack Canfield’s events. A woman twice my age came up to me, and asked out of nowhere (I did not know her then)- “How can I help you?” I remember this left me astonished. We often don’t find female support so boldly and openly but here was a woman who just asked how she could help me for absolutely nothing in return. I was so shocked and asked her – how can I help YOU? It was such a minuscule moment but one that meant the world. Here were two women supporting one another – no motives, no competition. Just two co-creators helping one another out.

Here were two women supporting one another – no motives, no competition. Just two co-creators helping one another out. 

Women see each other as competition only because society has put us up against one another. If we judged less, and helped more, we’d be using our strength of unity the best way possible. It’s human instinct to judge, but it is up to us as humans to decide whether we want to act upon them. Start viewing others as your co-creators. Trust me, there is enough sun for everybody.

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Photography by Iman